Guest Speaker - Dr. Mark Seidenberg

The Schenck School is honored to welcome Dr. Mark Seidenberg as a special guest speaker in October. Dr. Seidenberg is a cognitive scientist and professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Among other honors, Dr. Seidenberg recently was named the International Dyslexia Association's 2019 Samuel Torrey and June Lyday Orton Lecturer. He is the author of Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can't, and What Can Be Done About It.

 

We are thrilled that our faculty will benefit from Dr. Seidenberg's extensive research through workshops conducted during his time at the School. You can read more about Dr. Seidenberg and his work in this NPR interview and on his website. There will be two events open to parents and friends of the School:

  • Parent Book Club - Schenck School parents are invited to join Head of School Josh Clark on Tuesday, October 8, at 8:15 a.m. for a discussion of Mark Seidenberg's book, Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can't, and What Can Be Done About It. The book provides an overview of advances in reading science and examines the disconnection between this research and educational practice and its impact on literacy outcomes. This is a great opportunity to read Dr. Seidenberg's book and discuss it with Josh and other parents prior to the presentation on October 15. The book is available on Amazon and through most book sellers. Please RSVP here.
  • Special Community Presentation - Parents and friends of the School are invited to a fascinating and informative presentation by Dr. Seidenberg on Tuesday, October 15, from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. in the Schenck School Activity Center. Please RSVP to reserve your space.
Beth Moore

Mark Seidenberg is Vilas Research Professor and Donald O. Hebb Professor in the department of psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Seidenberg has conducted research on the nature of skilled reading, how children learn to read, developmental reading impairments, and the brain bases of reading, in English and other languages, for many years. His work with neural network models of reading brought attention to the importance of statistical learning, the development and complementary functions of the major reading circuits, and the role of “neural noise” in dyslexia. His current research focuses on how differences in spoken language experience, particularly the use of a non-mainstream dialect, contribute to achievement gaps in reading. Dr. Seidenberg is author of Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can’t, and What Can Be Done About It, which provides an overview of advances in reading science and examines the disconnection between this research and educational practice and its impact on literacy outcomes. Dr. Seidenberg is the 2019 recipient of the International Dyslexia Association’s Samuel Torrey Orton Award.